360 Degree Health Systems Development InitiativeAbout 360HSDI

360- Degree Health Systems Development Initiative (360HSDI) is a nonprofit organization specialized in emergency environments, humanitarian activities and development in diverse environments and ecosystems, globally and across Africa, including in South Sudan, and extensively in Nigeria.

360HSDI has strong capacity in intervening in the areas of children’s health, women’s health and health of the elderly through the expansion of health care access and diagnostic services. We are especially passionate about working in the most hard-to-reach and underserved communities, where we are most likely to find the most vulnerable. Our experts have strong knowledge around issues bordering on hypertension and diabetes in Nigeria and we are very enthusiastic about addressing the problem.

Core Approaches

01
Gender and Social Inclusion

Social inclusion is essential to 360 HSDI ability to succeed in its mission of achieving poverty reduction through economic growth. Gender and social inequality are known constraints to sustained economic growth at the national level. Research shows that the benefits from development programs are unequally shared with women and other marginalized populations. The World Bank estimated that productivity could increase in some countries by as much as 25 percent if the barriers that prevented women from entering the workforce were eliminated. Ultimately, the social, political and economic costs of social exclusion—whether due to income, gender, region, ethnicity, age, religion or disability—are significant.

Through our gender policy, 360 HSDI requires that gender issues are integrated throughout the threshold and compact cycle, from the initial country selection and assessment to the development and design of programs, project implementation, the monitoring of program results, and evaluation of program impacts.

02
Resilience

The increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters and humanitarian crises poses a major threat to long-term development, sustainable growth and poverty reduction in developing countries. Crises and shocks worsen already precarious livelihoods and can often trap people in poverty. The cost of disasters and humanitarian crises is rising, as climate change results in more severe weather-related events and the world faces new hazards and threats such as population growth, urbanization, depleted eco-systems, scarcity of natural resources, and complex conflicts. A large share of humanitarian funding is allocated to long-term, recurring crises. Helping individuals and communities to be better prepared for, withstand and recover from disasters is vital in reducing the impact of crises and avoiding loss of life and livelihoods. Building communities’ resilience can minimize the negative effects of disasters and prevent future humanitarian crises. There is a long-standing recognition that humanitarian crises affect people differently. A person’s resilience depends on many factors such as their economic well-being, education, gender, health, and age. Women, children, disabled people, and members of minorities are at risk of being least resilient.

03
Social Accountability

360 HSDI recognizes social accountability as a tool to reduce poverty via empowerment of the poor and as a step toward democratic governance. The development community has recognized that government institutions and service providers in the developing world far too often fail the poor. The failures are many and they are deep: corruption; services of abysmally low quality; no services at all. The consequence is continued deprivation of the citizens: dilapidated school buildings, clinics with no electricity or medications, absent teachers and nurses, no water, and lack of voice in important decisions. While the problem of poor public services is felt by everybody, the poor tend to be more affected by it and unable to compensate by switching to better-quality private services Social accountability has emerged as an important weapon in the fight for better governance and service delivery.

01
Food Security

Our aim is to promote food autonomy among the most vulnerable population groups, thus guaranteeing their food security in the short, medium and long term.

Our Strategy

Evaluation and monitoring of the food security situation
Food Aid
Financial Aid
Income-generating Activities:
Agricultural and Livestock Farming Activities

Food security activities must take the following into account: climate, geography, socioeconomic systems and political structures. For this reason, our programs are designed to attend to the specific needs of each crisis and each community.

02
Health

We offer holistic, pragmatic and robust community/health system and program appraisals. 360 HSDI draws on a multifaceted team of experts who have expertise across community engagement, social mobilization, HIV prevention, monitoring & evaluation, health products & technologies, health management information systems and health service delivery. 360 HSDI International experts reinforce the importance of engaging with stakeholders to achieve sustainable solutions.

03
WASH

The Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Program in Nigeria works to support civil society organizations towards providing transparency with state water utilities and promoting improved WASH services in six states: Abia, Delta, Imo, Niger, Sokoto and Taraba states. Prior assessment findings showcased the gaps of knowledge and skills in Urban WASH which includes limited knowledge of sanitation and hygiene promotion; poor understanding of the WASH policy environment and actors; weak or absence of gender policies, gender management information systems, and gender mainstreaming in their operations; poor techniques for identifying and analyzing target audiences—especially State Water Boards (SWBs)–and consumers for strategic communications and advocacy. In addition, the program seeks to build NGO capacity to coordinate with the State Water Boards (SWBs) and other WASH service providers (including the private sector) to improve urban WASH service delivery

Humanitarian Affairs

360HSDI implements and coordinates humanitarian interventions, activities response and advocacy. We respond to policy development issues.  Our activities include organizing and monitoring humanitarian funding, advocacy, policymaking, and information exchange to facilitate rapid-response teams for emergency relief.

The objectives of 360HSDI humanitarian action are to save lives, alleviate suffering and maintain human dignity during and in the aftermath of man-made crises and natural disasters, as well as to prevent and strengthen preparedness for the occurrence of such situations.

  • 01.

    Our humanitarian action is guided by the humanitarian principles of humanity

  • 02.

    The centrality of saving human lives and alleviating suffering wherever it is found

  • 03.
    Impartiality
    the implementation of actions solely based on need, without discrimination between or within affected populations
  • 04.
    Neutrality
    Meaning that humanitarian action must not favor any side in an armed conflict or other dispute where such action is carried out; and
  • 05.
    Independence
    the autonomy of humanitarian objectives from the political, economic, military, or other objectives that any actor may hold with regards to areas where humanitarian action is being implemented.

Education

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to creating sustainable development. In addition to improving quality of life, access to inclusive education can help equip locals with the tools required to develop innovative solutions to the world’s greatest problems.

Even though primary education is officially free and compulsory, about 10.5 million of the country’s children aged 5-14 years are not in school. Only 61 percent of 6-11 year-olds regularly attend primary school and only 35.6 percent of children aged 36-59 months receive early childhood education.

Gender, like geography and poverty, is an important factor in the pattern of educational marginalization. States in the north-east and north-west have female primary net attendance rates of 47.7 percent and 47.3 percent, respectively, meaning that more than half of the girls are not in school. The education deprivation in northern Nigeria is driven by various factors, including economic barriers and socio-cultural norms and practices that discourage attendance in formal education, especially for girls.

The reasons for lack of quality education are due to lack of adequately trained teachers, poor conditions of schools and equity issues related to opportunities provided to rural children. For quality education to be provided to the children of impoverished families, investment is needed in educational scholarships, teacher training workshops, school building and improvement of water and electricity access to schools

Our program advocates for education to be prioritized and targets children who are least likely to receive an education. The expected outcome of the program is that all children access and complete quality education, within a safe learning environment, gaining the skills and knowledge for lifelong learning.

Recovery and Re-Construction

The recovery and reconstruction scheme of 360HSDI is primarily aimed at helping survivors cope with immediate aftermath of disasters. Our office in Borno state will oversee majority of these engagements, especially in the Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. We aim to accomplish this by this by providing:

Temporary shelter for displaced indigenes.
Food supply
Water, sanitation and electrical facilities
Emergency health services.

Local labour will be engaged in these activities in order to improve the livelihood of indigenes. This will establish and strengthen co-ordination mechanisms for recovery and reconstruction efforts.

Food security and livelihood

Obtaining a quality education is the foundation to creating sustainable development. In addition to improving quality of life, access to inclusive education can help equip locals with the tools required to develop innovative solutions to the world’s greatest problems.

Even though primary education is officially free and compulsory, about 10.5 million of the country’s children aged 5-14 years are not in school. Only 61 percent of 6-11 year-olds regularly attend primary school and only 35.6 percent of children aged 36-59 months receive early childhood education.

Gender, like geography and poverty, is an important factor in the pattern of educational marginalization. States in the north-east and north-west have female primary net attendance rates of 47.7 percent and 47.3 percent, respectively, meaning that more than half of the girls are not in school. The education deprivation in northern Nigeria is driven by various factors, including economic barriers and socio-cultural norms and practices that discourage attendance in formal education, especially for girls.

The reasons for lack of quality education are due to lack of adequately trained teachers, poor conditions of schools and equity issues related to opportunities provided to rural children. For quality education to be provided to the children of impoverished families, investment is needed in educational scholarships, teacher training workshops, school building and improvement of water and electricity access to schools.

Our program advocates for education to be prioritized and targets children who are least likely to receive an education. The expected outcome of the program is that all children access and complete quality education, within a safe learning environment, gaining the skills and knowledge for lifelong learning.

Food security in figures

820 million people live with food insecurity worldwide
100 million less than 10 years ago and 209 million less than 20 years ago
63 developing countries have reached the first Millennium Development Goal within the timeframe
The prevalence of malnutrition has fallen from 18% to 11% in the last ten years

The causes of food insecurity depend on a range of factors – national and international policies that affect agricultural development or trade; food price fluctuations; pandemics like malaria or TB; armed conflict; and natural disasters.

We aim to take an all-round approach in all our activities in order to deal with the underlying and long-term causes of hunger and malnutrition. For this reason, we coordinate food security activities with those that deal with nutrition, water and sanitation and health. The integration of the different technical fields begins with the analysis and continues throughout each project’s periods of execution and evaluation.

Contact us

Get in touch with us

Abuja, Nigeria
info@360hsdi.org
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